Our Breeds

Irish Dexter Cattle are among the smallest of cattle breeds in the world, standing 40" tall and weighing 700–900 pounds. Though size is the breed’s most distinguishing characteristic, the Dexter is a useful and productive multi‑purpose animal.

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The Dexter originated in southern Ireland during the early 1800s. It was developed from the Kerry, an Irish dairy breed.  The breed name came from a “Mr. Dexter,” who promoted the cattle during the mid‑1800s. The Dexter became popular with smallholders in Ireland and in England, who appreciated its efficiency in producing both milk and beef on limited acreage.

Dexters are hardy, forage‑efficient cattle, with excellent maternal qualities. As with other dual‑purpose breeds, the quantity of milk produced varies between strains; those strains which have had more dairy selection produce more milk, while those which have been selected for beef produce less. The milk produced is high in solids, making it ideal for butter and cheese production. Dexter beef is lean and high in ­quality.  Dexters are good browsers and can rid pastures of some pest plants, and they may also be used as oxen.

Heritage Cross Hogs - breeding stock, feeders and finished butcher hogs.

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Currently all hogs for sale are crosses of three heritage breeds:  The Gloucestershire Old Spots, the Large Black and the Red Wattle.

The Gloucestershire Old Spots is a historic pig breed known for its distinctive white coat with black spots.  Gloucestershire pigs were selected as excellent foragers and grazers. The pigs are thrifty, able to make a living from pasture and agricultural by products.  These easy keeping qualities gave Gloucestershire Old Spots the nicknames “cottage pig” and “orchard pig.” British folklore claims the large black spots are bruises caused by the apples falling onto them as they foraged the orchard floors for food.  The Gloucestershire Old Spots pig is known for its docility, intelligence, and prolificacy. Boars reach a mature weight of 600 lbs (136 kg) and sows 500 lbs (125 kg). The breed’s maternal skills make it able to raise large litters of piglets on pasture. Its disposition and self‑sufficiency should make it attractive for farmers raising pasture pigs and those who want to add pigs to diversified operations.

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The Large Black pig is native to Cornwall, Devon, and Somerset in southwestern England. Originally known as the Lop Eared Black, the breed was selected for large size and efficiency of production on pasture and other forages.  The Large Black was used in small scale production of both pork and bacon.  As its name implies, the breed is large framed and solid black. Mature boars weigh 700-800 lbs (318-363 kg) and sows reach 600-700 lbs (272-318 kg) as an adult. The Large Black is best known for its foraging abilities and its maternal qualities. Large Black sows are able to raise and wean large litters of piglets out of doors.  Because of the increased interest in pasture raised pork by consumers, Large Black hogs are beginning to be recognized as a great choice in pastured management systems.

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The origin and history of the Red Wattle breed is obscure and many hypotheses have been put forward. What is certain is that the breed, as it is known today, was derived from the large, red, wattled hogs found in a wooded area of eastern Texas in the early 1970s by Mr. H.C. Wengler.  Red Wattle hogs are known for hardiness, foraging activity, and rapid growth rate. They produce a lean meat that has been described as flavorful and tender. The sows are excellent mothers, farrowing litters of 10 – 15 piglets, and provide good quantities of milk for their large litters. They have a mild temperament.  Red Wattles adapt to a wide range of climates. Their active foraging make them a good choice for consideration in outdoor or pasture-based swine production. Their gentle nature recommends them to the small-scale, independent producer.